Print Posted By Lost in France on 10 Nov 2005 in Living in France - Driving in France

Common Road signs you'll see whilst driving in France

Signposts in France are patterned according to EU recommendations - These are the most common ones you're likely to run into (not literally we hope).

 

national highwayBlue sign with white lettering  indicates  a motorway. If you see the word "peage" it indicates that there will be a Toll road.

 

 

 

 

highwayGreen signs  indicate a national highway. White signs  indicate local roads.

 

 

 

entering a townOn entering a town or city. Reduce your speed to less than 50 km/h, unless otherwise indicated.

 

 

 

tourist signBrown signs usually contain tourist information or local sights.

 

 

 

trunk road end of trunk roadTrunk or priority road & End of trunk road

 

 

 

 

 

give way The other traffic has priority and you must give way - these are often seen on roundabouts and mean you must 'yield' or give way to the other vehicles from the left or right. NB Unless otherwise stated you are supposed to give way to any vehicle entering the road you are travelling on from your right, this can take a lot of getting used to.

 

 

 

 

cattle crossing

 

Red triangles indicate a danger or warning - in this case cattle crossing.

 

 

 

 

stop

Pretty self explanatory - it's also worth noting that if you are caught not stopping completely and applying your handbrake you may be liable to a hefty fine.

 

 

 

 

 

no parking

 

No Parking.

 

 

 

 

no entryNo entry.

 

 

 

 

 

speed limit Indicates the current speed limit of the road. The speed limit on motorways is 130 km/h , 110 on divided highways, 90 km/h otherwise and 50 km/h in town, village or city areas. In wet conditions, these limits are reduced by 10 km/h and in snow & icy conditions, or in fog the speed is limited to 50 km/h on all roads.

 

 

 

 

speed cameraSpeed Camera .

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

turn right

You must turn right.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Parking area

Parking area with meters.

 

 

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